Canadian grain company Parrish & Heimbecker plans new input facility

CANADA – Canadian grain company, Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd (P&H) has unveiled plans to build a new crop input and grain facility in Dugald, Manitoba, Canada.

The facility will include 25,000 tonnes of grain storage, a loop track for continuous grain loading and movement as well as crop input facilities, including a fertilizer plant, chemical warehouse and seed treatment facility to serve customers in surrounding areas, including Transcona.

Construction is expected to begin in June, with the site becoming operational approximately 18 months thereafter.

According to the company, the new location bolsters its National Grain Asset Network leveraging the P&H grain merchandising team, while meeting both domestic and export market needs.

“We are looking forward to continuing to expand our family-owned agricultural operations with a new facility in Dugald,” said John Heimbecker, president of the Grain Division and executive vice-president, Parrish & Heimbecker.

“This new location will provide area producers with both efficient, state-of-the-art grain handling and crop input facilities as well as valuable insight, knowledge and expertise through a team of agronomic and grain marketing professionals that are dedicated to helping customers grow and market the best crop.”

The site will carry out operations including handling and shipping canola, corn, oats, soybeans and wheat.

It will be home to a team of agronomic experts who will leverage a full suite of seed, crop protection and crop nutrition products as well as an on-site seed treatment plant to provide area producers with crop input solutions that fit their farm.

It will also include 6,000-tonne dry fertilizer plant set to deliver custom fertilizer blends, including micronutrient additions.

Last year, it also unveiled plans to build a new crop input center, grain terminal in Gilbert Plains, northwest Manitoba, featuring 25,000 to 30,000 tonnes of grain storage.

Founded in 1909, P&H operates in grain trading, handling and merchandising, as well as crop inputs, flour milling and feed mills.

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