International Grains Council appoints Nathalie Dubé as new Chairman

ENGLAND – The International Grains Council (IGC) has announced that it has appointed Nathalie Dubé, Minister-Counsellor, High Commission of Canada, as its chairperson for 2019-20.

During its tenure, Canada is particularly interested in working with the Secretariat and the IGC membership to further develop information on the global pulse market, the IGC said.

Pulses are a staple crop in many countries and international trade in pulses continues to increase, yet there is limited market information currently available on these commodities.

The Secretariat estimates that in 2018-19, world trade of pulses was forecast at 16 million tonnes.

The Secretariat’s 2019-20 work program includes publishing more regular market information on pulses and establishing a supply and demand balance sheet for the main exporting countries.

The IGC said Canada is also interested in how approaches to regulating products of plant breeding innovation will impact the global grains and oilseeds trade.

Together with the IGC Secretariat, Canada will organize a seminar on this topic in conjunction with the 50th IGC Council Session in December 2019.

“I would like to thank the Council for supporting my candidacy as chair of the IGC for 2019-20,” Dubé said.

“In the current global trade climate, Canada strongly supports the IGC’s work, particularly as it relates to furthering work on pulse market information.

“I look forward to promoting the organization’s role to foster cooperation in international trade to secure the freest possible trade in grains and oilseeds.”

IGC, which is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year, is an intergovernmental organization which seeks to further international cooperation in grains trade; promote expansion, openness and fairness in the grains sector; and contribute to grain market stability and enhance world food security.

According to its April estimates, world total grains production in 2019/20 is projected to climb by 2% to 2.178 billion tonnes attributed to bigger harvests of wheat and barley.

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