Coca-Cola launches social initiatives in South Africa, Kenya aimed to create thriving, sustainable communities

SOUTH AFRICA – Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa (CCBSA) has dished out new solar powered underwater pumping and treatment systems, through the Coke Ville Groundwater Project, aimed to solve South Africa’s water problems.

The solar powered facilities were issued to five viable self-sustaining groundwater projects that were identified in Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape.

Through these systems the Coke Ville Project aims to deliver over 90 million litres per year by the end of 2021.

“Groundwater is a huge untapped water source that can effectively satisfy the demand of a fast-growing population while easing the burden on the system,” says Nozicelo Ngcobo, Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability Director at CCBSA.

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“Not only does this mean cleaner water and better health outcomes for citizens but allows municipalities the margin to maintain and upgrade existing infrastructure,” she said.

South Africa still relies largely on surface water for its water needs, a resource that is overstretched and prone to pollution, drought and system failure.

The country is expected to reach physical water scarcity by 2025, accelerating to 17% water scarcity by 2030, based on current usage.

Government’s long-term water resource plan currently underway involves moving the country to alternative sources, include reusing and recycling grey water, rainwater harvesting and groundwater.

“Groundwater is typically cleaner than surface water, meaning it is easier to treat. It can also be deployed much faster in areas where an accessible source is identified, reducing the cost of transmission with shorter pipelines and simpler maintenance.”

Nozicelo Ngcobo – Public Affairs, Communication and Sustainability Director at CCBSA

According to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), only 64% of households in the country have access to a reliable water supply service.

Approximately 11% of wastewater treatment and water treatment works are completely dysfunctional, while 56% of wastewater treatment works and 44% of water treatment works are in poor condition.

Of the available resources, groundwater has the best potential to support a fast-growing population.

It is estimated that South Africa has the same amount of groundwater as surface water. While groundwater use has increased by an average of 0.6% per year during the past four years, only about 40% (or 3 billion cubic metres per year) of available groundwater is used.

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“Groundwater is typically cleaner than surface water, meaning it is easier to treat. It can also be deployed much faster in areas where an accessible source is identified, reducing the cost of transmission with shorter pipelines and simpler maintenance,” Ngcobo says.

CCBSA empowers youths

The beverage company is also committed to creating inclusive growth opportunities for communities, women and the youth, through the launch of CCBSA Pivotal Program Intake (PPI) for 2021.

CCBSA looks to provide 44 learning opportunities across key areas of the business, specifically Commercial (Sales), Manufacturing and Technical (Packaging) and Logistics (Warehouse).

The chosen individuals will get practical exposure to a Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) environment like that of CCBSA.

In previous years, the programme has been used as a critical channel to identify potential talent that can be absorbed into key frontline roles in respective functions.

CCBA Kenya launches PET recycling initiative

Meanwhile, Coca-Cola Beverages Africa in Kenya, has partnered with Airview management Ltd, NPE-K, Petco and T3-Kenya to launch segregation at source project at Airview apartments, Embakasi East, Nairobi.

The project will go a long way in helping the over 350 residents with a solution to recycle their PET plastics responsibility.

In 2019, the three parties i.e., CCBA, Petco, T3-Kenya, launched an innovation challenge aimed to provide innovative solutions to bale post-consumer PET plastic in order to ease their transportation for recycling and manufacturing.

The competition dubbed Beyond Baling Innovation Challenge (BBIC) targeted University students, Small and Medium Enterprises and the JuaKali sector.

The challenge identified and award the best innovations to bale post-consumer PET plastic in Manual Baler, Renewable Energy Powered Baler and Grid Powered Baler categories.

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