Kellogg’s teams up with UK brewery to create beer from cereals

UK – The Kellogg Company has joined forces with UK brewery Seven Bro7hers to create beer from its rejected Rice Krispies and Coco Pops breakfast cereals.

The two have co-created coco based ‘Sling it out Stout’ and a snap, crackle and pop ‘Cast off Pale Ale’.

The new craft beers are made from discarded grains created in the cooking process at the cereal giant’s Manchester factory.

These include rice-based flakes that are either overcooked, uncoated or discoloured, and therefore have not passed Kellogg’s strict quality control, would not make it into the pack and would inevitably go to animal feed.

Both beers have an ABV of 5.5%.

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“Our primary objective is to convert every kilo of grain we buy into food that we can sell. However, that’s not always possible,” said corporate social responsibility manager for Kellogg’s UK and Ireland, Kate Prince.

“Kellogg’s is always looking for innovative ways to use surplus food, the collaboration with Seven Bro7hers is a fun way to repurpose non-packaged, less-than-perfect cereal.

“This activity is part of our new “Better Days” commitments which aim to reduce our impact on the planet.”

Sling It Out Stout uses 80kg of Kellogg’s Coco Pops to replace malted barley, creating a chocolate flavour and a similar process has been used to develop Cast Off Pale Ale, which features 80kg of Rice Krispies to impart sweet notes.

All three beers are now available from the Seven Bro7hers website and will soon be stocked by Ocado and Selfridges.

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Seven Bro7hers was founded in 2014 by McAvoy brothers: Guy, 57, Keith, 50, Luke, 45, Daniel, 44, Nathan, 42, Kit, 37, and Greg, 35.

Last year Kellogg moved its European HQ from Airside Business Park in Swords to MediaCityUK, Salford, neighbouring Seven Bro7hers Brewery.

In 2018, the companies partnered to create Throw Away IPA, a 5% ABV craft beer made from Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.

The 5% ABV IPA is available in keg and can formats.

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