UK— The Port of Tilbury’s grain terminal has installed ten metal silos, 30m in height, and a flat storage unit with a combined storage capacity of 36,000 tons.

The port operators said the steel silos will be filled and emptied using a new 650 ton per hour transfer conveyor system, while the combined silo and flat store facility returns the terminal’s total on site storage to 100,000 tons.

A new concrete silo, the work on which will be completed in December 2023, will add a further 34,000 tons of automated storage, underpinning the grain terminal as the UKs largest import/export grain handling facility.

The Tilbury Grain terminal has been in operation for over 50 years and is a key strategic facility in the UK for the grain import and export markets, with it handling over two million tons of product from around the world.

These recent installations come two years after a blast caused by a rare “dust explosion”, partially destroyed the roof of the grain store.

“Coupled with the construction of the concrete silo, the grain terminal will be back to full capacity on one site this year,” said Peter Ward, commercial director at the Port of Tilbury.

“Our terminal is a key facility in the South-East of England and an essential part of the UK agricultural supply chain for imports and exports and benefits from the full multimodal services at the Port of Tilbury, including river barge transportation into central London.”

The terminal also operates a monthly coastal shipping service from Tilbury to its sister port in Kirkcaldy, Scotland for Carr’s Milling.

Our terminal is a key facility in the South-East of England and an essential part of the UK agricultural supply chain for imports and exports and benefits from the full multimodal services at the Port of Tilbury, including river barge transportation into central London

Peter Ward commercial director at the Port of Tilbury

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Efforts to mitigate Ukraine’s grain crisis

Meanwhile, last week, UK transport secretary Grant Shapps, hosted a virtual meeting with his counterpart at the Ukrainian ministry of infrastructure, Oleksandr Kubrakov during which he outlined more detail about the £10m (US$11.5m) Ukrainian railways support package, previously announced by UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, at the G7 Summit.

The UK officials said these funds would support the Black Sea grain initiative, which allows the safe passage of grain, food, and fertilizer exports out of Ukraine in protected shipping corridors. So far, they said the initiative has freed 721,449 metric tons of goods from three Ukrainian ports.

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