USDA postulates high total sugar production for US in 2017/18

USA – The US is expected to record a high beet and total sugar production in 2017/18 contrary to an early forecast that estimated production down to 8.0 million tons, according to the USDA’s report.

USDA estimates US 2017/18 sugar production at 9,230,000 short tonnes, with Florida producing 1,992,000 tons, Louisiana, 1,859,000 tons set to surpass the prior record of 9,032,000 tons in 1999-2000.

However, 2017/2018 imports will not change from those forecast in January at 3,316,000 tons with major supplies from Mexico projected at 1,268,000 tonnes.

Since lower production was partially offset by higher beginning stocks, total supply was forecast at 14,422,000 tons, down 57,000 tons from January.

Deliveries for food were forecast at 12,325,000 tons, while ending stocks for 2017-18 were forecast at 1,842,000 tons with ending stocks-to-use ratio being raised to 14.6%.

In 2016/17, sugar ending stocks were estimated at 1,876,000 tons, up 25,000 tons from January on a like decrease in sugar deliveries for food.

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The initial report forecast in January forecast a lower sugar production due to slightly lower beet and cane sugar expectations.

The same report reflected that US sugar imports were likely to rise with a 14.3% increase with Mexico supplying nearly one-half probably due to higher consumption and relatively flat stocks.

Brazil’s might in sugar production was associated with favorable weather, improved crop management, and lower use of cane for ethanol.

According to the report, world production would remain relatively unchanged at 171.5 million tons with India and Philippines expected to record a rise in production due to better yields and favorable weather respectively.

At the same time, the world sugar export market is expected to rise to 59.2 million with Brazil, Ukraine and Pakistan forming major players in the segment depending on factors like greater available supplies and higher production.

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